Well played

Sunday Photo Fiction time (I’ve been away too long) and another opportunity to turn a picture that’s worth a thousand words into a picture of 200 words or fewer — hopefully.

Where to go with that oh-so-harmless-looking well?

“Back to the well,” Jax said, a wry smile on his face.

It was a running joke. A well with no water, sandwiched in an alley and flanked by a flower bed that never needed watering. No one knew why. The soil was permanently wet and the flowers forever nourished.

“I’m welling up,” I replied.

The running joke had become a game. How many bad puns could you come up with before drawing a blank.

“Well said,” Jax answered.

“Well played,” I replied.

“Well enough?”

“I’ll allow it, though I don’t feel well about it.”

“Well done.” Actual awe in Jax’s voice.

“Well, I am the best.”

“Well, why not feel that way,” he said. “You’ve done well for yourself so far.”

“Ouch, a double helping of wellness,” I mocked.

“That doesn’t count,” he jumped in.

“Well, if you’d have waited I would’ve had another retort,” I smirked. “But you were well ahead of me getting out a response.”

He looked at me, then back at the well. It just sat there, not even echoing our bad jokes because there was no depth to it. Jax had no response.

“Well,” I stood up. “I guess I win.”

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Friday Fictioneers: Sheepish beginnings

Another chance to join the Friday Fictioneers club and follow the most-interesting photo prompt. I assume I’m not the only one that feels like a lamb being led to the laughter.

The first day of our honeymoon and it had started off on the wrong foot.

We hadn’t discussed it before the marriage, but here it was. Move into his place or mine?

The argument grew heated quickly.

Then the traffic stopped.

“I’m going to walk,” I said, opening the door.

“Sam, wait,” John started.

I swung the door open, only to have it pushed right back in, the first of what seemed like thousands of sheep streaming against us.

“Guess this road was a baaaaad idea,” John said.

My giggle turned into gales of laughter for the two of us.

Friday Fictioneers: Moving down river

A weekly photo prompt challenge from Rochelle that I’m excited to delve into. My first attempt at Friday Fictioneers. Check it out too, so you can take a shot at it. And see if you too can keep it under 100 words.

Last night the kids took to dumping an old shopping cart into the muck.

Ever since the power plant up river had built a dam, Laketown had dried up.

With no river lifeline, the jobs had set sail along with the fish.

Even the schools were dwindling. Most of the time my two didn’t go, and I didn’t see much point in sending them.

We’d be shoving off too, and soon. Before I spent my last twenty on a forty. The RV was on empty. And so was I. Not sure which one I wanted to fill up more.

 

Sale of the century

An “Odd” contraption is this week’s centerpiece for Sunday Photo Fiction, a weekly journey that has writers delving into their imaginations to create flash fiction in 200 words or fewer. So let’s see what we come up with.

“I can’t believe it,” Farmer Joe hooped after watching the stranger drive off. “Sam Hell, I thought there was no way in tarnation that contraption would sell!”

His wife watched the pickup truck disappear around the bend.

“Joe,” she said, “now that it’s gone, will you tell me what that was?”

Farmer Joe started laughing with a merriment his wife hadn’t heard in years.

“What’s so funny, honey?” she asked.

“You don’t know what that was?” he asked back.

“No, I don’t.”

“Well, you ain’t the only one,” he smiled. “I’ve never known what it was. It’s been here since we moved in forty-two years ago. I’ve fiddled with it multiple times over the years. Never was able to get it to do nothing. Never moved for me no matter what dials and switches I pushed and pulled. So it’s just been settin’ there.”

“Did he know what it was?” she asked.

“Nope,” Joe answered. “Said he liked the way it looked. Thought it might look nice in a ‘gallery’ I think he called it.”

“Well I’ll be,” his wife smiled, thinking of the man in his fancy clothes. “City folk, they just don’t make no sense.”

Searching for an answer

A challenging Sunday Photo Fiction this week — at least for me. But that just makes it more enjoyable, testing a writer’s skill to see what they can come up with. With that, off we go into a thickening fog that is quickly consuming everything our eyes perceive.

foggy

As the fog swallowed the bridge, the waters calmed. The waves that had been slapping the shoreline were now simply pawing at the sand that warmed Johnny’s toes.

He dug them deeper before he turned to Jules.

“So, what do you think?”

She glanced at him and then looked away, staring somewhere into the fog that now enveloped the Atlantic Coastline as far as the two could see.

“I don’t know,” she said. “I know it’s not much of a response, but it’s the only one I have now.”

Johnny let out a soft sigh — something between frustration and resignation.

He put his arm around her shoulders to pull her close. She shrugged him off.

“I love you, Johnny,” she said. “But it’s not the right time.”

The fog had sifted its way ashore, lapping at Johnny’s toes, Jules’s sandals.

Johnny said nothing. Instead, he watched the fog climb his legs, swirl around his midsection. His eyes followed as it climbed Jules’s bare legs, for she was standing now. Soon, its density had grown so thick, he couldn’t see her.

From somewhere not close, he heard her.

“Bye, Johnny,” her fading voice said. “I won’t forget you.”

Searching for the write words

Whenever I hit a snag — known as the accursed ‘Writer’s Block’ — I’m instantly cast back to “Throw Momma from the Train.”

An odd reference? Maybe. But Billy Crystal’s character of Larry constantly searching for the right word to end the sentence, “The night was…” is the perfect example of writer’s block. Throughout the film Larry is searching for that missing word, and that’s just in hopes of starting a new novel. Never mind the rest of the book’s plot. Just the idea of how important that lead sentence is, is a great example of how one word can get you on a roll.

So often the flashing cursor is unbelievably intimidating. Like it’s waiting for you, beckoning. Maybe even taunting.

“I’m not stuck,” you tell the cursor. “I’m just waiting for the right words.

“And they’ll be here any second.”

Stop waiting for the words and just start typing. The first thing that comes to your mind could lead you down an entertaining path. I’ve written on a similar topic to this in the past, especially on just getting going.

How about a gentle push. Here’s your start:

“The first time the alarm didn’t go off…”

Take it from there. Don’t let that cursor hold you up.

 

Sorry about the moon!

Sunday, time for Sunday Photo Fiction, a chance to turn a photo into Flash Fiction of somewhere between 100-200 words. This is my first shot at it. Follow the link and give it a try, too.

Image

I was just washing my window, the living-room one that overlooks the Pacific, when I rubbed the bottom of the moon away.

I wasn’t using anything other than plain-old Windex, when, poof, I smeared a piece of the Earth’s satellite from the sky.

One minute it was a full moon, the next it was, well, you see it. It’s not all there any more.

The sad thing is, I have no idea how to undo it. I would’ve tried spraying and wiping again, but I was worried I’d make more vanish. And the moon is so little as it is, I can’t bear the idea of making more disappear.

Please forgive me. I’m truly sorry and would never have cleaned my window at that time of night if I’d known this was going to happen. I promise, I won’t ever do it again.

But let me know if it’s too hot one day, and I can try cleaning the window when the sun is out.